Thanks to their high level of public transport, Londoners create fewest emissions and are the greenest people in Britain. But like any big city, London eats up energy and pumps out pollution. 'How can a boomtown be green?' asks how we can reduce rather than increase environmental damage. Could London be a model for sustainable big cities around the world? Or will attempts to make it more sustainable stifle its growth and force people out?

Presuming your green experience extends to dilute , badly packaged Ecover products which don't look particularly futuristic friendly in your kitchen cupboards and trips to recycling bins [ isn't it all separated anyway or hasn't your postcode got collection days ?]as part of your lifestyle, then the question is a bit black. Employing a green footprint within urban regeneration investments should give the individual a return not just a good conscience . It should give them something that they want to go back to more to learn and benefit from , a green footprint membership. From a green , folding financial saving , a green bus , a green light to a green mint mars bar to work , rest and play . Considering , as a consumer who could probably qualify as a personnal shopper, I could not find any green serviettes to go with my green spinach and black grape salad I had a dilema . Green serviettes are quite a niche market . To invest in the market gap and solve my dilema profitably they would have to be made of an original non stainable reusable textile , available in every colour or recyclable paper .A bit of a green elephant . Solution - white rice on a green plate , with the green salad on a white plate on a green cloth with a white serviette would achieve the desired effect without going to gratuitous expense for a one off expense , like the Dome . Another dilema . If you drop your serviette on the floor in a restaurant , do you : a] pick it up and use it again ? b] leave it where it is ? c] take somone elses? d] pick it up and then realise you should have left it on the floor ? e] ask for another ? Are you happy that you have thought about your present before your future and when are you going to start . The service is there if you know how to get it and the boomtown can be green because there is the choice of lower carbon emmissions for your footprint .
Posted by: isabel moet on 30/08/07 at 04:35PM
email: vanessa_cutts05@yahoo.co.uk

Yes because it is people not buildings that are green. being green is fun, increases one's quality of life and is not necessarily expensive.
Posted by: ElisabethJ on 23/08/07 at 07:34PM

Yes because it is people not buildings that are green. being green is fun, increases one's quality of life and is not necessarily expensive.
Posted by: ElisabethJ on 23/08/07 at 07:28PM

Being Green is not only possible, but to be otherwise is just shirking responsibility. This image shows a building in Japan that demonstrates the potential for office developments to really enhance the urban environment. Instead we increasingly see our open space and biodiversity in urban areas reduced to pavements and a few small parks. Perhpas the question should be how can we capitalise on a boomtown situation to address the issues of our built environment. Whilst there is money available why are we not creating funds to address the poor levels o housing quality that exist? Casestudies for the EcoHomes XB demonstrated that by addressing the poor building quality in social housing refurbishment, specifically aiming to reduce heating and cooling costs, that the occupants benefitted from a more stable living environment with associated health benefits. By reducing the temperature fluctuations in a day and across seasons, by reducing draughts and damp, and in simple cost effective manners, the standard of living improved - in particular for the most vunerable, the young, ill or elderly. Whilst our town booms should we not be finding ways to improve our environment and everyones lives?
Posted by: AD on 13/08/07 at 01:32PM
email: oldelpasto@hotmail.com
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If councils would think ahead about things such as when they replace a roof put a solar panel in it would make a massive difference. In my local borough I see regeneration projects going ahead with no thought for the green issues that they could incorporate it should be part of local legislation that they use green energy where ever possible. A small outlay now saves a fortune in the future.
Posted by: Debiann Leighton on 05/07/07 at 03:22PM
email: wotzupnow@hotmail.com

If councils would think ahead about things such as when they replace a roof put a solar panel in it would make a massive difference. In my local borough I see regeneration projects going ahead with no thought for the green issues that they could incorporate it should be part of local legislation that they use green energy where ever possible. A small outlay now saves a fortune in the future.
Posted by: Debiann Leighton on 05/07/07 at 03:22PM
email: wotzupnow@hotmail.com

My challange to the Mayor is, expand London but set a target for year-on-year reduction in the distance each Londoners travells using all forms of MOTORISED transport. This will force development where emplyment is closer to home, better facilities for walking and massive expansion of cycling. It would probably rule out Crossrail - but think how much cycling could be improved with the money that Crossrail will soak up. London could pioneer a new kind of prosperity - more healthy, perhaps a boom while slowing down the rat race?
Posted by: David Janner-Klausner on 21/06/07 at 11:33PM

Even though we are (if the statement is true) the most eco-friendly city, I still think there is a great deal we can do to improve the emmissions that cause pollution. I still think that there are other ways in which we can go about tackling the pollution, it just needs to be put into practice. Like, making generations NOW more aware of what the effects of pollution have on our Earth, as I think there needs to be more focus and emphasis on teaching younger generations about what CAN be done and what will happen if we choose to do nothing. We still need to reduce our use of emissions, use of cars etc, and I feel that public transport should be a great deal more reliable, so that others choose to to use it also.
Posted by: Laura Brown on 06/06/07 at 02:46PM
email: laugasmic@hotmail.co.uk

I have come across a website which promises less cars circulating in London thanks to a smart parking search both through the web and mobile. It's www.Park-UP.com - i have used it and i must say that i found a cheap parking slot in Central London in 2 minutes. it was about time someone started to think of the amount of cars circulating around London looking for a parking place and creating gas emissions unnecessarily.
Posted by: monica Costa on 05/06/07 at 02:12PM
email: monica.costa@gmail.com

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