While the 2012 Olympics will hold the whole city up to world scrutiny it also presents an opportunity to raise aspirations for the capital. Now is the time to find out what sort of London Londoners really want. What changes would they most like to see - whether completed or in the pipeline - by 2012? A panel of architects, artists, writers and thinkers, will each offer up what one thing they would do to make London better and more beautiful.

I don't really understand how the Olympics can do anything permanent for the WHOLE of London, only for the area where they are. But if holding them here somehow generates more funds, then cycling lanes & more swimming pools would be great. Holding them here could make people more interested in sport and perhaps also improve the nation's sporting performance. A few London gold medallists would be great.
Posted by: ElisabethJ on 23/08/07 at 07:33PM

I don't really understand how the Olympics can do anything permanent for the WHOLE of London, only for the area where they are. But if holding them here somehow generates more funds, then cycling lanes & more swimming pools would be great. Holding them here could make people more interested in sport and perhaps also improve the nation's sporting performance. A few London gold medallists would be great.
Posted by: ElisabethJ on 23/08/07 at 07:32PM

the gaps need to be filled, in a communications oriented infrastructure that needs the co-operation of will: showers&changing rooms for all people who cycle to work or at least tax incentives for businesses that implement this; the ecobuses that exist at present to be given the testing and 'hydrogen highway' infrastructures they need; the community resource centres that are integrated as part of local school&college syllabus activities. Decorating our public space for it to be a joy to be in. Voluntary programmes where people can make something for themselves and their communities, like mini-wind generators, composting devices, recycling nodes, 'livinglawn' roof projects, housebuilding apprenticeships tied to land-purchase co-ops. Get involved!
Posted by: jules on 30/07/07 at 02:34PM
email: emozihr@gmail.com
View associated image

please please get all those arrogant horrible cyclists off the pavement why cant they walk like normal human beings instead of crushing everything in their path and being self righteous about it
Posted by: roseanna twisk on 19/07/07 at 10:16PM

Wouldn't it be nice if they could create cycle lanes which were safe. How about creating cycle lanes all by it self at the edge of the pavement (Cut in the pavement and make a bike road). At the moment I am tired of nearly being killed by buses vans and car users and also the abuse I have to endure when I am not even in the wrong !!!! This way, it will be safe as we will not need to keep pulling out because the bus is at the bus stop etc... I have not been cycling long and thought i would buy a bike to cut down on the expense of car journeys - but if things continue they way they are (nearly being killed everyday) I may have to abandon the bike and go back to my car.
Posted by: Rosie B on 16/07/07 at 01:54PM

I hope that the money that needs to be raised for the olympics will not result in more cuts in the funding for the arts. While planning the large scale event we must not forget about already existing cultural institutions suffering from lack of funding.
Posted by: tyna on 26/06/07 at 01:37AM

From the blog today:

This morning saw the second Debate London breakfast take place at the Evening Standard's offices in Kensington. It was a great morning, with David Higgins, chief executive of the Olympic Delivery Authority, addressing a distinguished audience on the development of the Olympic park in Stratford. Also, there were fantastic contributions from Rod Sheard, of HOK Sport Architecture (who is designing the olympic stadium), Elliott Lipton of property developer First Base, and Evening Standard city editor Chris Blackhurst who put some tough questions to Higgins about whether east London really needs a permanent athletics stadium.

The tone of the morning, organised by the Architecture Foundation, was positive, with the Olympic team perhaps still glowing from its A+ inspection yesterday from the International Olympic Committee. The IOC even likes the logo.

The tough questions, inevitably, were about the legacy. AF director Rowan Moore brought up this article by George Monbiot, which says that "the only certain Olympic legacy is a transfer of wealth from the poor to the rich", and accuses the games of marginalising the poor and encouraging gentrification. What does anyone out there think?

Posted by: The Editor on 15/06/07 at 06:29PM
email: mail@kieranlong.com

I want You - architect/city planners to provide alternative to 2012 Games GREENery park (not carpark) spaces at each urban block neighborhood for us, children and elder people to Breath, Enjoy and Communicate in the big city. I don't want Tesco and tennis courts - I want and requre my Open Space back! See urban blocks in Manhattan, Bronx, and don't say: -too dence city fabric! Burry underground Supermarkets, petrol car 'barking' -give me trees and wind. Make your infrastructure ground below! Otherwise, we moving to Countrysides!! PS. By the way, your streetlights and road cross-walks do not work at all!;(
Posted by: Greenpin on 07/06/07 at 12:11PM
email: greenpin@mail.ru

I hope that, with all the money spent on it, that the 2012 Olympics will be something us Brits can be proud of, not embarressed about. I don't like the logo. It doesn't stand out to me at all. The colours are hideous and an attempt to be TOO modern in my opinion. It took me a while to realise the shapes made out a barely recognisable '2012' when I know that a logo needs to be clear on what it is advertising. For me, it doesn't do it's job. Overal I hope the Olympics will give us a chance to show we can pull off the event EFFECTIVELY and give us an oppertunity to become more involved with the history of the event and then add our own history and nationality to it.
Posted by: Laura Brown on 06/06/07 at 02:50PM
email: laugasmic@hotmail.co.uk

Some way of banning all those free papers on the tube...
Posted by: Jix on 02/06/07 at 11:31AM

A place where I can once again cycle without being in fear of my life. I've recently semi-retired from my bike after a decade, having seen too many blameless fellow cyclists splatted on the road - and no, most of them weren't jumping a red light and/or terrorising a pensioner. Though the death rate's not *that* high, there are many injured every day, and I've lost all pleasure in cycling in this city. Ironically, it's probably the congestion charge that's done it. I support the charge for environmental reasons, but a city of swiftly flowing traffic, needs to be complemented by greater protections for everyone who's not in a car. Those narrow green lanes at the sides of busy roads do not give any feeling of safety. A good, swift bike route parallel with the river would be a start. A comprehensively excellent set of cycle lanes by 2012 would again get me off the tube during the week.
Posted by: Sereh on 31/05/07 at 01:24PM

Supported by
Debate London is organised by The Architecture Foundation Charity Registration no.1006361
The Architecture Foundation is funded by Arts Council England www.architecturefoundation.org.uk